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Wprowadzenie i cel pracy:
Imbir (Zingiber officinale) jest rośliną szeroko stosowaną na całym świecie. Ze względu na bogaty aromat i charakterystyczny ostry smak znalazł zastosowanie w kuchni jako przyprawa. Jednak mnogość zawartych w nim fitoskładników sprawia, że imbir wykazuje również pozytywny wpływ na organizm człowieka. Celem pracy jest przedstawienie możliwości wykorzystania imbiru i jego bioaktywnych składników w leczeniu wybranych chorób.

Skrócony opis stanu wiedzy:
Imbir jest źródłem wielu cennych składników odżywczych, które nadają mu właściwości organoleptyczne, ale także prozdrowotne. Olejki eteryczne i oleożywica są głównymi składnikami odpowiedzialnymi za specyficzny zapach i ostry smak imbiru. Ponadto imbir zawiera wiele fitoskładników, takich jak seskwiterpeny i monoterpeny, do których należą: α-zingiberen, α-faranezen, β-bisabolen, β-felandren, zingiberol, geraniol, linalool, cynoele, a także zingeron i szogaole. Imbir jest od dawna stosowany w leczeniu zaburzeń żołądkowo-jelitowych i sercowo-naczyniowych, bólów reumatycznych, cukrzycy, nowotworów i depresji. Nadal znajduje zastosowanie w chińskiej i arabskiej medycynie ludowej jako środek rozgrzewający lub jako lek na choroby układu pokarmowego i wątroby. Ponadto stosuje się go w zaparciach, przeziębieniach, nieżytach nosa i zapaleniu oskrzeli. Badania wskazują również na cenne właściwości antyoksydacyjne, przeciwbakteryjne i przeciwzapalne imbiru. Te korzyści zdrowotne przypisuje się zawartym w nim związkom fenolowym, głównie gingerolowi i shoagolowi.

Podsumowanie:
Imbir jest bogatym źródłem wielu związków bioaktywnych, które posiadają właściwości lecznicze i mogą być stosowane wspomagająco w wielu chorobach, takich jak cukrzyca, choroby układu krążenia, nudności, wymioty i procesy zapalne.


Introduction:
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a plant widely used all over the world. Due to its rich aroma and characteristic, spicy taste, it has been used in the kitchen as a spice additive. However, the multitude of phytonutrients it contains makes ginger a plant with a positive effect on the human body.

Objective:
The aim of the study is to present the possibilities of using ginger and its bioactive ingredients in the treatment of selected diseases.

Brief description of the state of knowledge:
Ginger is a source of many valuable nutrients that determine its organoleptic characteristics, which also has pro-health properties. Essential oils and oleoresin are the main compounds responsible for the specific smell and sharp taste of ginger [8]. Additionally, ginger contains many phytonutrients, such as sesquiterpenes and monoterpenes, which include α – zingiberene, α – faranezene, β – bisabolene, β – felandren, zingiberol, geraniol, linalool, and cineole, as well as zingerone and shogaole. Ginger has been used for a long time to treat gastrointestinal and cardiovascular disorders, rheumatic pains, diabetes, cancer and depression. It is still used in Chinese and Arab folk medicine as a warming agent, or as a remedy for the digestive system and liver diseases. Moreover, it is used in constipation, cold, rhinitis and bronchitis. Research also indicates high antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. These health benefits are attributed to its phenolic compounds, mainly gingerols and shoagols.

Conclusions:
Ginger is a rich source of multiple bioactive compounds which have medicinal value, and has a supporting effect in several diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, nausea, emesis and inflammatory processes.

Antoniewicz J, Jakubczyk K, Gutowska I, Janda K. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) – spice with therapeutic properties. Med Og Nauk Zdr. 2021; 27(1): 40–44. doi: 10.26444/monz/134013
 
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